Godus – Being A God With The Power To Wait

godus
2.5 Overall Score
Gameplay: 2.5/5
Design: 3/5
Duration: 2/5

Neat planet forming mechanic | A lot to unlock | Intertwined advancement

Each new god power introduces more waiting | Not that much to actually do

godus1 Godus   Being A God With The Power To Wait

God like powers have always intrigued gamers throughout video game history, and there have been a number of simulation games letting you control entire worlds. Godus is a brand new one that comes to iOS courtesy of Peter Molyneux, who is well known for simulation games, Kickstarter, and DeNA. The end result is a free to play simulation game that lets you sculpt an expansive world with your fingers. After you form a few levels, you can start to set up huts for a fledgling civilization, and then it’s all about expansion from there. The game follows the advancement of the human civilization from primitive times to today’s standards, and you get to oversee the progress.
godus3 300x225 Godus   Being A God With The Power To Wait
When you first start up Godus, you see that there’s a whole lot to see, and do with a few different avenues to spend your time. The main thing to do is to keep increasing the size of your population by sending out builders, because population increases directly tie into unlockable cards. There are various civilization advancements, and God powers to unlock as you progress through the game, and each one lets you do more. While your population is expanding, you can send out an expedition to distant lands to discover new enhancements that help you activate the card powers. There are also hidden treasure chests in the land that you can unearth with the same types of enhancements, and there are beacons to send your populous to in an attempt to uncover more land.

The game does a good job of intertwining everything together, and provides constant objectives to keep you coming back. Soon, you will unlock new regions, and new abilities to advance your civilization. That includes unlocking new resources, and installing installations to create those resources like the farming sectors that produce wheat. There’s a definite draw to the game that keeps you actively engaged, and interested in expanding, and shaping your realm. There’s also a lot of potential going forward with various mysteries to uncover to keep the Godus world active, and intriguing. There’s a lot to like with the touch controls, graphical quality, and overall intricate gameplay structure, but it doesn’t last.
godus6 300x225 Godus   Being A God With The Power To Wait
As stated earlier, the game is free to play, and the system isn’t that obtrusive at the beginning allowing you to get quite a ways into the game. After about 15 unlocked cards, the game comes to an abrupt stand still requiring you deal with multiple timers that really prevent you from interacting with the game. First off, there’s the basic belief system, which is used for all your God powers from the basic transforming of the land to creating settlements, monuments, and activating special abilities. You have to wait on the buildings to provide belief power, and then you activate the farms to supply wheat to the builders. Soon, you’re waiting on farmers, and builders to unlock the next card, and it all bogs down with wait times ranging from a half hour to six hours. You’re left with a real grind that doesn’t offer many God like powers to overcome the waiting, or to even interact with the world without greatly depleting your resources. One extra amusing aspect is how the new powers give you more to do, but at greater cost to in all actuality restrict what you can do.

Godus (Free, Universal) gets off to a promising start that sadly falls flat after awhile leaving you not much to do, and not much incentive to keep coming back to the ever increasing wait times.

Free, Universal



lg share en Godus   Being A God With The Power To Wait

SHARE THIS POST

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Stumnleupon
  • Niziol

    The game is good but the waiting issue has just ruined the whole experience